AZ Direct Data Operation: Execution Memory vs Buffer Memory

User avatar
om_tech_support_JT
Posts: 1058
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 2:59 pm
Location: Torrance, CA
Contact:

AZ Direct Data Operation: Execution Memory vs Buffer Memory

Postby om_tech_support_JT » Wed Sep 07, 2016 5:27 pm

Q: I have the AZ98AAD-TS10-3 product and I am trying to learn how to operate the motor in direct data operation mode. I was reading through the manual and noticed that for the direct data operation, I can send the information to either the Execution memory, or the Buffer memory. Can you please explain the difference between these two?


A: When using the direct data operation (DDO), you can write new data such as a new position for the motor to move to and start the operation via a trigger at the same time. It's a function suitable for applications that need to make constant changes to its stored data such as position value, operation type, operating current or speed. Without Data Operation, you would have to send position and trigger as two separate commands.

The difference between Execution Memory and Buffer Memory are described below.

AZ buffer memory timing chart.jpg
AZ buffer memory timing chart.jpg (189.78 KiB) Viewed 2394 times

AZ execution memory timing chart.jpg
AZ execution memory timing chart.jpg (123.11 KiB) Viewed 2394 times


Some examples of the type of motion that can be done are Incremental motion or Absolute motion. The operation of the trigger may be different depending on the operation type which is used.

For an Incremental motion:
-When the data is stored to the Execution memory, the trigger will activate the motion. If the trigger is activated again while the motion is in effect, then the trigger will be ignored. Once the motion has stopped, then the trigger can be activated again.

-When the data is stored in the Buffer memory, then the trigger will activate the motion. If the trigger is activated again, then the trigger will be stored. Once the motion has stopped, it will automatically run the triggered motion which was stored while the motor was moving. This allows you to “pre-set” one triggered motion to the buffer memory.

For an Absolute motion:
-When the data is stored to the Execution memory, the trigger will activate the motion. If the trigger is activated again, then the new value for absolute motion will be executed immediately. This will overwrite the current absolute position motion.

-When the data is stored to the Buffer memory, the trigger will activate the motion. If the trigger is activated again, then the new position will be stored in the memory. Once the positioning is finished, then it will move to the position which was stored from the second trigger. This will wait for the first motion to be completed before moving to the next absolute position.

JS

Return to “Stepping Motors & Controls”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests