Brushless Gear Noise vs V-Series Gear Noise

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om_tech_support_JT
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Brushless Gear Noise vs V-Series Gear Noise

Postby om_tech_support_JT » Tue Oct 23, 2012 5:03 pm

Q: I am interested in switching from my World K-Series AC gearmotors to your brushless DC gearmotors to decrease my gear noise. I am working on a device that will run inside a museum so it needs to be very quiet. A V-Series AC gearmotor and a brushless gearmotor were recommended to me as possible options, but I was wondering if you have any data that compares the noise generated from the gears of my World K-Series gearmotor and your brushless gearmotors. Can you offer this data? I just want to ease my mind before purchasing one to test.

A: Unfortunately, we do not have noise data available for our brushless gearmotors for comparison. However, I can tell you that the GFS style gearheads (parallel and hollow-shaft types) that we use for our current standard brushless motors use the same pinion design as our V-Series AC gearmotors, so the noise data would be very similar to the noise data we actually show for our V-Series AC gearmotors. For example, we show that the noise level for our V-Series AC gearmotors is about 29 dB for a 80 mm frame motor when measured from 1 meter (A-range measurement). The gear noise from our brushless gearmotors should be around the same. We've received favorable feedback from customers who are using brushless gearmotors in similar museum applications.

GFS brushless motor gearheads uses same pinion design from V-Series to reduce noise.jpg
GFS brushless motor gearheads uses same pinion design from V-Series to reduce noise.jpg (41.01 KiB) Viewed 3236 times

GFS, V-Series noise comparison data, gear ratio 60 to 1.jpg
GFS, V-Series noise comparison data, gear ratio 60 to 1.jpg (38.73 KiB) Viewed 3236 times

The pinion design from our V-Series and brushless gearmotors are optimized for quiet operation while maintaining strength. We use a special tooth-surface machining technology to remove cutting marks of 1 to 2 micrometers from the surface of the pinion shaft teeth, and we also use a highly accurate assembly technology that ensures precision at micron levels. All of these contribute to noise reduction of the gearmotor.

Testing the motors with your actual load and speed parameters is still the best way to compare the noise, but hopefully this information eases your mind a bit.

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